The Philosophers Stoned

Episode 50: Friedrich Nietzsche

In this episode, we discuss the philosophical and theological views of Friedrich Nietzsche. Nietzsche, today recognized as one of the most influential thinkers in history, never achieved fame while he was alive. His books, polemical attacks on Christianity and “slave morality,” did not sell. Nietzsche suffered from chronic ill-health, and was an invalid most of…

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Episode 49: Jean Jacques Rousseau

We continue our series on the philosophical and intellectual climate that preceded the two World Wars. In this episode, we discusss Jean Jacques Rousseau. Rousseau is known as the father of 18th century Romanticism. The Romantics sought to liberate human beings from the constraints of conventional morality. Rousseau believed that Science and the Arts had…

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Episode 48: Hegel

In this episode, we begin our series on the philosophical climate that preceded the two World Wars. Today, we discuss the life and work of the German philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831). Hegel argued that human history progresses according to a process called The Dialectic. At each stage in The Dialectic, one nation is…

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Causation Part 3: The Kant Awakens

Immanuel Kant is notorious for being almost impossible to understand, which is the hallmark of a truly great philosopher. Send your comments to TPSpodcast420@gmail.com.

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Causation Part 2: The Hume Strikes Back

Isaac Newton’s revolutionary theory of physics upended Aristotle’s purpose-driven view of causation, and offered a new hope that we could finally obtain genuine scientific knowledge of the universe. But in a cruel twist of fate, a mysterious intellectual named David Hume emerged from the darkness of Scotland and struck at the heart of Newton’s rebellion….

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Episode 45: Aristotle on Causation

This is the first episode in a three-part series on the philosophy of causation. In this episode, we discuss Aristotle’s views on causation. Aristotle was one of the most influential philosophers of all time, and even served as Royal Tutor to the young Alexander the Great. Aristotle understood causation as a question about why things…

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Episode 44: Arguments

In the parlance of our times, an argument means a disagreement, and disagreements are often nothing more than people contradicting each other over and over again, and rarely lead to truth. But in philosophy, an argument means a series of premises that justify a conclusion. For example, Aristotle, who lived over 2000 years ago, invented…

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Episode 43: George Berkeley

If a tree falls in a forest, and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? George Berkeley would say that if a tree falls in a forest, and no one perceives the tree, then the tree didn’t even exist in the first place. Berkeley is often known as the father…

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Episode 42: Zombies

In philosophy, zombies are beings that are exactly like human beings in every single way except one. A philosophical zombie might talk about how great the coffee is, they might drive to work and answer the phone, they might go home and walk the dog. However, philosophical zombies lack one thing: consciousness. If it is…

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Episode 41: The Categorical Imperative

In this episode, we discuss Immanuel Kant’s famous “Categorical Imperative.” An imperative is a command- you ought to do such and such. Kant argues there are two kinds of Imperatives: Hypothetical imperatives and Categorical imperatives. A hypothetical imperative is something you should do if you have a particular goal in mind: for example, if you…

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